Chinese 9 Course Dinner

The following recipes form the most popular items in a nine-course dinner program:

BIRD’S NEST SOUP

Soak one pound bird’s nest in cold water overnight.  Drain the cold water and cook in boiling water. Drain again.  Do this twice. Clean the bird’s nest. Be sure to take out all feathers and loose particles.

Put the bird’s nest into a pot, cover with water and make a soup. Chop one-half pound of pork into a hash and add to bird’s nest. Cook over slow fire for two hours. Add one tablespoon Chinese sauce and dash of salt. Pour into bowl, garnish with shredded chicken and cooked ham, and green Chinese parsley.

 

STEAMED CHICKEN

Clean a chicken, cover with water, and boil until tender. This makes a soup which is generally used as stock for other courses. Remove chicken. Chop up, bones and all, into slices, which are heaped into a bowl. Garnish with slices of ham, black mushrooms cooked in soup stock, and green  parsley.

WHOLE DUCK

Clean a duck. Cut an opening below neck and remove bones and all. Make this mixture: one-half pound pork, one-fourth pound ham, one cup white chesnuts, one cup chestnuts, one cup water chestnuts, one-half cup mushrooms. Chop all fine, and add salt and pepper. Stuff duck with this mixture, place in a pan and steam for two hours. Serve duck in bowl, pour a little chicken soup over it, garnish with green parsley.

FRIED PIGEON

Clean pigeons; it will require three to make one bowl. Wipe dry. Cook the bird in boiling oil. Place lettuce on bottom of bowl before you place the cooked bird in it. Garnish with won-tun chips. This dish tastes best when eaten with a special Chinese salt called wai-yim.  (wai-yim is MSG or monosodium glutamate)

WHITE MUSHROOM CHICKEN 

Clean chicken. Remove bones. Cut meat into pieces. Cover with a seasoning made of Chinese sauce, two tablespoons of sugar, and five tablespoons of cornstarch. Cover one can of white mushrooms with water in pot.  When soup comes to a boil, add the seasoned chicken.  Cook for one hour and a half, adding a little soup stock. Pour into serving bowl, garnish with cooked shredded ham and green parsley.

FRIED FROG LEGS

Cut two frogs in pieces, dip in a mixture of three eggs, three tablespoons cornstarch, four tablespoons Chinese sauce, and a little wine.  Fry the frogs’ legs in hot fat, dipping one piece at a time, as you would doughnuts. Serve garnished cauliflower, bamboo shoots, and Holland peas cooked in a little soup stock, and green parsley.

SHARK’S FINS

Soak sharks’ fins over night.  Clean out all the loose particles. Cover with water and boil for two hours, adding tow tablespoons Chinese sauce, one cup chicken soup stock, dash of salt, and one tablespoons cornstarch. Serve garnished with shredded chicken, already cooked, and green parsley.

OYSTER SPECIAL

Soak one-half pound dried oysters in hot water.  Remove and grind into hash, together with one-fourth pound fish cake (scraped raw fish), one-fourth pound ham, one cup water chestnuts, one cup white mushrooms, and a little bamboo shoots. Make thumb-size sausages of this hash, by enclosing each with the clinging fat of pork.  Dip each sausage into egg and then fry in hot fat. Serve garnished with green parsley.

DEEP SEA ABALONE 

Soak one and one half pounds Chinese dried abalone in water over night.  Drain and wash clean. Cover with water and boil for six hours, until abalone becomes fluffed and soft. Remove and slice.  Into the broth left place one cup of sliced water chestnuts.  Put in the slices of abalone.  Add two tablespoonfuls sugar, two tablespoonsful cornstarch, four tablespoonsfuls Chinese sauce. Simmer for half an hour. Serve garnished with parsley.

SEASONED PORK SLICES

Boil two and one-fourth pounds pork for half an hour.  Use the part of pork that is used for making bacon. Remove pork and drain.  Wipe dry.  Fill frying pan with peanut oil and cook the pork in it.  Remove and wash in cold water.  Wipe dry. Make a seasoning of narm-yai (red bean sauce) and Chinese sauce. Slice pork and saturate each slice with this sauce. Heap slices of pork in deep bowl over slices of cooked lotus. Place bowl in covered kettle and steam for one hour.

THE NINE-COURSE DINNER

Chinese dinners are given for all the usual occasions, a marriage, a birthday, to honor a friend or to celebrate success in some enterprise.  The guests receive invitations in the form of a folded red cardboard with the name inscribed on a loose leaf inside.  Written inside the folder in black characters are the time of the dinner, where it is to be given, the purpose of the celebration and the names of the hosts.

If you arrive at the place at the time set you are likely to find yourself the only one present.  The dinner may actually begin one to three hours after the time announced.

Gradually the other guests drift in.  You chat with them, getting hungrier all the time.  Most of the social diversion of a Chinese dinner party comes before the dinner itself is served.  Frequently the guests rise and do directly home from the table.  And there is little conversation during the dinner itself, the time at the table being devoted almost exclusively to enjoying the food.  Silence is not a breach of good manners; only the clatter of earthen spoons and the patter of chop sticks is heard.

The size of a dinner party is indicated b the number of tables.  Each table is round and ofa a size to accommodate just ten guests comfortably, no more nor no less.  A twelve-table dinner party therefore, is obviously a large and elaborate affair.  The guests sit on stools rather than on chairs.

The table is covered with a clean white cloth and there are no decorations in the center, as soon there will be no room for such a thing as flowers.  Ready on the table are small dishes of dried watermelon seeds, Chinese sugared fruits, dried cured chidken livers, cakes and fresh fruit.  There is also a typically shaped pitcher of soyu or Chinese sauce and perhaps a jug of light wine.

At each place is laid a pair of chopsticks, a china spoon, a plate about the size of a butter chip and another about the size of a saucer.  There is also a bowl about six inches in diameter.  All the food is eaten from this one bowl, portions from each large dish brought on being dipped into it as desired.

The small plate is used to hold soyu or Chinese sauce.  A morsel of food is picked up in the chopsticks, dipped into the sauce and then put into the mouth.  The saucer-sized plate is used to hold bits of bone or anything else discarded.

About half way through the dinner, bowls filled with plain boiled rice, are brought on.  This rice is eaten plain, no food or sauce being poured over it.  Almost at the end of the meal small tea bowls filled with steaming tea are brought on along with the teapot.  Several bowls of tea are usually sipped to conclude the meal, corresponding to the demi tasse.  The practice of serving tea in the beginning is a a western innovation.

The guests take their places at the tables, frequently the men being all together and the women likewise.  The sweets and water-melon seeds and other things on the table are nibbled until the first course appears.

The dinner is usually described as “nine course,” although this is not strictly adhered to.  Each main dish is counted as one course, although there may be special sauces or other accompaniments to increase the actual number of dishes served.  The large dishes are placed one by one in the middle of the table, at intervals so that there is time for each one to be sampled before the next one appears.  One can return for a second or third helping of any of the dishes which one particularly likes.

About the time the first dish is put on the table some one, acting as host if the host is elsewhere, pours wine from an earthen wine pot into tiny wine bowls, each holding about a large tablespoonful. All the guests drink together and thereafter the bowls are kept filled and sips are taken as desired.  Seldom are more than three or four of these tiny bowls emptied by an individual in the course of a meal.

The dinner reverse the western order, running from sweets to soup instead of the reverse.  The first course, served after the appetizers, is usually bird’s nest soup, which is more like a stew than a soup.  The courses that follow can be anything desired provided they have variety and contrast.  The final course is a thin soup and this is not accounted one of the nine.

(source: Chinese Cookery, Compiled by M. Sing Au – 1932 – Creart Publications, Honolulu, U.S.A.)

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Salmon Caviar

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A Summer Memory

 

Here, where these low lush meadows lie, We wandered in the summer weather, When earth and air and arching sky, Blazed grandly, goldenly together.

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Indian Modes of Hunting – Setting Fox Traps

Aug. 13, 1898 Forest and Stream, Pg. 125

Game Bag and Gun.

Indian Modes of Hunting. III.—Foxes.

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The Master of Hounds

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A Cure for Distemper in Dogs

 

The following cure was found written on a front flyleaf in an 1811 3rd Ed. copy of The Sportsman’s Guide or Sportsman’s Companion: Containing Every Possible Instruction for the Juvenille Shooter, Together with Information Necessary for the Experienced Sportsman by B. Thomas.

 

Transcript:

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Bess of Hardwick: Four Times a Lady

Bess of Harwick

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A Few Wine Recipes

EIGHTEEN GALLONS is here give as a STANDARD for all the following Recipes, it being the most convenient size cask to Families. See A General Process for Making Wine

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Mudlark Regulations in the U.K.

Mudlarks of London

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Commercial Fried Fish Cake Recipe

Dried Norwegian Salt Cod

Fried fish cakes are sold rather widely in delicatessens and at prepared food counters of department stores in the Atlantic coastal area. This product has possibilities for other sections of the country.

Ingredients:

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Classic Restoration of a Spring Tied Upholstered Chair

?

This video by AT Restoration is the best hands on video I have run across on the basics of classic upholstery. Watch a master at work. Simply amazing.

Tools:

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Origin of the Apothecary

ORIGIN OF THE APOTHECARY.

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Horn Measurement

Jul. 23, 1898 Forest and Stream, Pg. 65

Horn Measurements.

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Silverfish damage to book – photo by Micha L. Rieser

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Producing and Harvesting Tobacco Seed

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Thomas Jefferson Correspondence – On Seed Saving and Sharing

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“November 27, 1818. Monticello. Thomas Jefferson to Henry E. Watkins, transmitting succory seed and outlining the culture of succory.” [Transcript] Thomas Jefferson Correspondence Collection Collection 89

The Real Time Piece Gentleman and the Digital Watch Vault

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BOMBAY. MUSULMAN FANATICISM.

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by John Partridge,drawing,1825

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CHAPTER V

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THE FOWLING PIECE, from the Shooter’s Guide by B. Thomas – 1811.

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The Charge of the Light Brigade

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Vintage woodcut illustration of a Eel

 

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Indian Modes of Hunting – Musquash

Hudson Bay: Trappers, 1892. N’Talking Musquash.’ Fur Trappers Of The Hudson’S Bay Company Talking By A Fire. Engraving After A Drawing By Frederic Remington, 1892.

Indian Modes of Hunting.

IV.—Musquash.

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Blackbeard’s Jolly Roger

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PEACH BRANDY

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NEW YORK, N.Y., MAY 9, 1949

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What is the Meaning of the Term Thorough-bred Fox-hound

Reprint from the Sportsman Cabinet and Town & Country Magazine, Vol.1, Number 1, November 1832.

MR. Editor,

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The Stock Exchange Specialist

New York Stock Exchange Floor September 26,1963

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Valentine Poetry from the Cotswold Explorer

 

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Proper Wines to Serve with Food

Foie gras with Sauternes, Photo by Laurent Espitallier

As an Appetizer

Pale dry Sherry, with or without bitters, chilled or not. Plain or mixed Vermouth, with or without bitters. A dry cocktail.

With Oysters, Clams or Caviar

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Harry Houdini Investigates the Spirit World

The magician delighted in exposing spiritualists as con men and frauds.

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Naval Stores – Distilling Turpentine

Chipping a Turpentine Tree

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A Conversation between H.F. Leonard and K. Higashi

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Historic authenticity of the Spanish SAN FELIPE of 1690

San Felipe Model

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Sir Peter Francis Bourgeois and the Dulwich Picture Gallery

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Wine Making

Wine Making

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The Charge of the Light Brigade

Half a league, half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. “Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns!” he said. Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. Home Top of [...] Read more →

Here’s Many a Year to You

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The Cremation of Sam McGee

Robert W. Service (b.1874, d.1958)

 

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The Billesden Coplow Run

*note – Billesdon and Billesden have both been used to name the hunt.

BILLESDEN COPLOW POEM

[From “Reminiscences of the late Thomas Assheton Smith, Esq”]

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Historical Uses of Arsenic

The arsenicals (compounds which contain the heavy metal element arsenic, As) have a long history of use in man – with both benevolent and malevolent intent. The name ‘arsenic’ is derived from the Greek word ‘arsenikon’ which means ‘potent'”. As early as 2000 BC, arsenic trioxide, obtained from smelting copper, was used [...] Read more →

The Hatha Yoga Pradipika

THE HATHA YOGA PRADIPIKA

Translated into English by PANCHAM SINH

Panini Office, Allahabad [1914]

INTRODUCTION.

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Modern Slow Cookers, A Critical Design Flaw

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The Age of Chivalry

KING ARTHUR AND HIS KNIGHTS

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Chinese 9 Course Dinner

The following recipes form the most popular items in a nine-course dinner program:

BIRD’S NEST SOUP

Soak one pound bird’s nest in cold water overnight. Drain the cold water and cook in boiling water. Drain again. Do this twice. Clean the bird’s nest. Be sure [...] Read more →

Books Condemned to be Burnt

BOOKS CONDEMNED TO BE BURNT.

By

JAMES ANSON FARRER,

LONDON

ELLIOT STOCK, 62, PATERNOSTER ROW

1892

———-

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Banana Propagation

Banana Propagation

Reprinted from the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA.org)

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Mortlake Tapestries of Chatsworth

Mortlake Tapestries at Chatsworth House

Click here to learn more about the Mortlake Tapestries of Chatsworth

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From the Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 13

Crane, Francis by William Prideaux Courtney

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JP Morgan’s Digital Currency Patent Application

J.P. Morgan Patent #8,452,703

Method and system for processing internet payments using the electronic funds transfer network.

Abstract

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Tobacco as Medicine

The first published illustration of Nicotiana tabacum by Pena and De L’Obel, 1570–1571 (shrpium adversana nova: London).

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Mrs. Beeton’s Poultry & Game – Choosing Poultry

To Choose Poultry.

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Napoleon’s Pharmacists

NAPOLEON’S PHARMACISTS.

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The First Pineapple Grown in England

First Pineapple Grown in England

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Should one be interested in serious mass scale production, click here for scientific resources.

Growing pineapples in the UK.

The video below demonstrates how to grow pineapples in Florida.

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The Human Seasons

John Keats

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Sea and River Fishing

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Vitruvius Ten Books on Architecture

VITRUVIUS

The Ten Books on Architecture

TRANSLATED By MORRIS HICKY MORGAN, PH.D., LL.D. LATE PROFESSOR OF CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY

IN HARVARD UNIVERSITY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND ORIGINAL DESINGS PREPARED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF HERBERT LANGFORD WARREN, A.M.

NELSON ROBINSON JR. PROFESSOR OF ARCHITECTURE IN HARVARD [...] Read more →

Christmas Pudding with Dickens

Traditional British Christmas Pudding Recipe by Pen Vogler from the Charles Dickens Museum

Ingredients

85 grams all purpose flour pinch of salt 170 grams Beef Suet 140 grams brown sugar tsp. mixed spice, allspice, cinnamon, cloves, &c 170 grams bread crumbs 170 grams raisins 170 grams currants 55 grams cut mixed peel Gram to [...] Read more →

How to Distinguish Fishes

 

Sept. 3, 1898. Forest and Stream Pg. 188-189

How to Distinguish Fishes.

BY FRED MATHER. The average angler knows by sight all the fish which he captures, but ask him to describe one and he is puzzled, and will get off on the color of the fish, which is [...] Read more →

The Hunt Saboteur

The Hunt Saboteur is a national disgrace barking out loud, black mask on her face get those dogs off, get them off she did yell until a swift kick from me mare her voice it did quell and sent the Hunt Saboteur scurrying up vale to the full cry of hounds drowning out her [...] Read more →

Cleaning Watch Chains

To Clean Watch Chains.

Gold or silver watch chains can be cleaned with a very excellent result, no matter whether they may be matt or polished, by laying them for a few seconds in pure aqua ammonia; they are then rinsed in alcohol, and finally. shaken in clean sawdust, free from sand. [...] Read more →

The Snipe

THE SNIPE, from the Shooter’s Guide by B. Thomas – 1811

AFTER having given a particular description of the woodcock, it will only. be necessary to observe, that the plumage and shape of the snipe is much the same ; and indeed its habits and manners sets bear a great [...] Read more →

Fortune, Independence, and Competence

THE answer to the question, What is fortune has never been, and probably never will be, satisfactorily made. What may be a fortune for one bears but small proportion to the colossal possessions of another. The scores or hundreds of thousands admired and envied as a fortune in most of our communities [...] Read more →

Looking for a Gift for the Book Collector in the Family?

Buying a book for a serious collector with refined tastes can be a daunting task.

However, there is one company that publishes some of the finest reproduction books in the world, books that most collectors wouldn’t mind having in their collection no matter their general preference or specialty.

Public Attitudes Towards Speculation

Reprint from The Pitfalls of Speculation by Thomas Gibson 1906 Ed.

THE PUBLIC ATTITUDE TOWARD SPECULATION

THE public attitude toward speculation is generally hostile. Even those who venture frequently are prone to speak discouragingly of speculative possibilities, and to point warningly to the fact that an overwhelming majority [...] Read more →

Tuna and Tarpon

July, 16, l898 Forest and Stream Pg. 48

Tuna and Tarpon.

New York, July 1.—Editor Forest and Stream: If any angler still denies the justice of my claim, as made in my article in your issue of July 2, that “the tuna is the grandest game [...] Read more →

King William III on Horseback by Sir Godfrey Kneller

Reprint from The Royal Collection Trust website:

Kneller was born in Lubeck, studied with Rembrandt in Amsterdam and by 1676 was working in England as a fashionable portrait painter. He painted seven British monarchs (Charles II, James II, William III, Mary II, Anne, George I and George II), though his [...] Read more →

Clairvoyance – Methods of Development

CLAIRVOYANCE

by C. W. Leadbeater

Adyar, Madras, India: Theosophical Pub. House

[1899]

CHAPTER IX – METHODS OF DEVELOPMENT

When a men becomes convinced of the reality of the valuable power of clairvoyance, his first question usually is, “How can [...] Read more →

The Perfect Salad Dressing

The following recipes are from a small booklet entitled 500 Delicious Salads that was published for the Culinary Arts Institute in 1940 by Consolidated Book Publishers, Inc. 153 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill.

If you have been looking for a way to lighten up your salads and be free of [...] Read more →

David Starkey: Britain’s Last Great Historian

Dr. David Starkey, the UK’s premiere historian, speaks to the modern and fleeting notion of “cancel culture”. Starkey’s brilliance is unparalleled and it has become quite obvious to the world’s remaining Western scholars willing to stand on intellectual integrity that a few so-called “Woke Intellectuals” most certainly cannot undermine [...] Read more →

A Creative Approach to Saving Ye Olde Cassette Tapes

Quite possibly, the most agonizing decision being made by Baby Boomers across the nation these days is what to do with all that vintage Hi-fi equipment and boxes full of classic rock and roll cassettes and 8-Tracks.

I faced this dilemma head-on this past summer as I definitely wanted in [...] Read more →

Carpenters’ Furniture

IT requires a far search to gather up examples of furniture really representative in this kind, and thus to gain a point of view for a prospect into the more ideal where furniture no longer is bought to look expensively useless in a boudoir, but serves everyday and commonplace need, such as [...] Read more →

Popular Mechanics Archive

Click here to access the Internet Archive of old Popular Mechanics Magazines – 1902-2016

Click here to view old Popular Mechanics Magazine Covers

Home Top of Pg. Read more →

Beef Jerky

BEEF JERKY

Preparation.

Slice 5 pounds lean beef (flank steak or similar cut) into strips 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick, 1 to 2 inches wide, and 4 to 12 inches long. Cut with grain of meat; remove the fat. Lay out in a single layer on a smooth clean surface (use [...] Read more →

Guaranteed 6% Dividend for Life. Any takers?

Any prudent investor would jump at the chance to receive a guaranteed 6% dividend for life. So how does one get in on this action?

The fact of the matter is…YOU can’t…That is unless you are a shareholder of one of the twelve Federal Reserve Banks and the banks under [...] Read more →

How to Make Money – Insurance

Life insurance certificate issued by the Yorkshire Fire & Life Insurance Company to Samuel Holt, Liverpool, England, 1851. On display at the British Museum in London. Donated by the ifs School of Finance. Photo by Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin FRCP(Glasg)

From How to Make Money; and How to Keep it, Or, Capital and Labor [...] Read more →

Catholic Religious Orders

Saint Francis of Assisi, founder of the mendicant Order of Friars Minor, as painted by El Greco.

Catholic religious order

Catholic religious orders are one of two types of religious institutes (‘Religious Institutes’, cf. canons 573–746), the major form of consecrated life in the Roman Catholic Church. They are organizations of laity [...] Read more →

The Character of a Happy Life

How happy is he born and taught. That serveth not another’s will; Whose armour is his honest thought, And simple truth his utmost skill

Whose passions not his masters are; Whose soul is still prepared for death, Untied unto the world by care Of public fame or private breath;

Who envies none that chance [...] Read more →

Fly Casting Instructions

It is a pity that the traditions and literature in praise of fly fishing have unconsciously hampered instead of expanded this graceful, effective sport. Many a sportsman has been anxious to share its joys, but appalled by the rapture of expression in describing its countless thrills and niceties he has been literally [...] Read more →

Birth of United Fruit Company

From Conquest of the Tropics by Frederick Upham Adams

Chapter VI – Birth of the United Fruit Company

Only those who have lived in the tropic and are familiar with the hazards which confront the cultivation and marketing of its fruits can readily understand [...] Read more →

The Preparation of Marketable Vinegar

It is unnecessary to point out that low-grade fruit may often be used to advantage in the preparation of vinegar. This has always been true in the case of apples and may be true with other fruit, especially grapes. The use of grapes for wine making is an outlet which [...] Read more →

Cocktails and Canapés

From The How and When, An Authoritative reference reference guide to the origin, use and classification of the world’s choicest vintages and spirits by Hyman Gale and Gerald F. Marco. The Marco name is of a Chicago family that were involved in all aspects of the liquor business and ran Marco’s Bar [...] Read more →

Ought King Leopold to be Hanged?

King Leopold Butcher of the Congo

For the somewhat startling suggestion in the heading of this interview, the missionary interviewed is in no way responsible. The credit of it, or, if you like, the discredit, belongs entirely to the editor of the Review, who, without dogmatism, wishes to pose the question as [...] Read more →