Tuna Record

TROF. C. F. HOLDFER AND HIS 183LBS. TUNA, WITH BOATMAN JIM GARDNER.

July 2, 1898. Forest and Stream Pg. 11

The Tuna Record.

Avalon. Santa Catalina Island. Southern California, June 16.—Editor Forest and Stream: Several years ago the writer in articles on the “Game Fishes of the Pacific Slope,” in Scribner’s Magazine and the Cosmopolitan, mentioned the “leaping tuna” as a possible catch with rod and reel, and for seven or eight years I have made many attempts to take one, but always failed by using too light tackle, and I must confess I would rather fail than take so noble a fish unless all the advantage was on its side. Year after year the leaping tuna gathered in my rod tips and lines and hooks. He unreeled 600ft. of line and took the tip of my rod before 1 realized what the mass of foam astern meant; and Mexican Joe, my boat man, hinted that I was asleep; but I was not. And so time went on and finally I laid out a campaign, which was to use a reel that would hold 1,000ft. of 21-strand line, and before I could find a reel and equipment some one else caught the first fish. This was two years ago; and now the fish is caught by skillful wielders of the rod almost every day, when the attempt is made: and it was reserved for me to make the record catch of the largest game fish ever taken on the Pacific slope—so it is said—with rod and reel; and I am inclined to go further and claim that the catch represents the most active and hardest-fighting thoroughly game fish ever taken on rod and reel and 21-strand line. I am aware that this will be disputed by tarpon fishermen all over the country, but in making the claim I am perfectly loyal to the silver king. I have landed this magnificent fish and know it well. I have also caught all the fish of the Mexican gulf that can be taken, including the Florida jew fish. I have taken, I think, every fish in the Atlantic from the striped bass to the swordfish, and on the Pacific from a black sea bass, weighing 347lbs., to a 5olb. white sea bass; so that, so far as experience goes. I consider that I am a fair judge of the fighting qualities of a fish, and I have no hesitation in saying that if my 1831b. tuna was fastened to one end of a rope and three 1831b. tarpon were on the other end, the tug-of-war would be at once decided, as the tuna would wear them out and never stop. In other words, I consider that the tuna entirely outclasses the tarpon in strength and activity, in the fierceness of its rushes, and in the splendid attempts to escape. I confess that the tarpon is more sensational in its leaps, which are due to the shallow water, but the tuna is the acrobat of the sea, and leaps on all occasions, except when hooked, and then, having 200 or 300ft. of blue water beneath, he has no occasion to take to the air. But I have seen them leap 10 and 15ft. into the air and seize flying fish in full flight; and the grandeur of their feats passes all description. Again the tuna is an excellent table fish, bringing a high price in the market, and sportsmen feel no hesitation in taking a fish which is in constant demand, and not killed simply to afford sport.

I think then that I have proved the claim of the tuna to be classed as a thoroughly game fish, and I would give it the first place among the oceanic fishes. My evidence must be the story of my catch, and a description of the tactics of the fish, which at the end of four hours, I am free to confess, left me exhausted, while the fish could readily have towed my boat five miles further.

I took my fish with a 200Z. rod, about what is used for tarpon and striped bass by some fishermen, though possibly heavier than some use. The reel was a Vom Hofeholding 900ft. of cuttyhunk line, to which was attached a 6ft. piano wire leader. The bait was a I2in. flying fish, the natural food and prey of the tuna. The boat used was a regular Santa Catalina yawl, broad of beam, and rigged with two seats so that the fishermen face the stern, and are back to the oarsman and gaffer, who in this instance was “Jim Gardner,” an expert and thorough tuna fisherman. But for his faithful work I should have lost the fish several times, as for four hours it kept him upon the move to keep me facing the fish. My companion was Mr. C. H. Heverin, of New York.

Our boat was fastened behind a launch, and at 3:30 in the morning we slipped out of Avalon Bay. which was as smooth as glass. Mr. Heverin had the first strike, not 100yds. from the beach, and in an hour had brought a fine tuna to gaff, weighing oolbs. The method of procedure is for the boatman to hold the painter, having his oars ready, and the moment a strike comes to cast off from the launch and back water, getting headway in the boat to offset the terrific rush of the fish, which will often unreel 500 or 600ft. of line belore the fisherman remembers where he is. I received my strike at 6:30, just be low Long Point, six miles from Avalon, and Mr. Heverin received a strike at the same moment; the fish coming boiling along the surface striking in a highly sensational manner. Mr. Heverin failed to hook, and slipped aboard the launch to continue fishing, from her, while I began the fight which lasted four hours without let up. I had been trolling with about 150ft. of line out, and at the rush the fish tore at least 500ft. from the reel, with accompanying music that could be heard a long distance. Gardner started the boat astern and I stopped the fish, the boat rushing through the water for several hundred yards, the fish now plunging down and beating upon the line in savage attempts at escape. Then I gained 20ft., then lost 50 in a savage rush. Then the magnificent creature rose rapidly from a two minute sweep deep in the heart of the channel, until I broke water in a cloud of foam 500ft. away. Then turned and facing the boat came at me like an arrow from the bow. It was a magnificent move, and I reeled for my life on the big multiplier, but could hardly take in the line be fore the fish turned 20ft. from me a blazing mass of silver in the sunlight, and shot away with a velocity that was inconceivable, bearing off the line in one great burst of speed. It was with the greatest difficulty that I stopped the fish at what I believe to have been between oo and 6ooft.. using the heavy leather pad brake as carefully as I could, and realizing that had I not soaked line and pad in advance the line would have been burnt off at the first rush. The fish now plunged down deep into the blue channel, sulking like a salmon for a few moments, hammering on the line in -a peculiar manner. Then, as I gained on it in reeling, it rose in great circles, towing the boat rapidly, and when at the surface it came at me again, hoping to take me unawares. Failing in this, it made several desperate plunges, rose to the surface and heading out to sea swam rapidly away, towing the boat at half the speed of the launch against the oars of my boatman, who kept them over, hoping to stop it. It towed the boat a mile in this way, during which I gained and lost perhaps 200ft. Then I finally turned it, and after a sensational rush in and by me it kept on and towed us over a mile in the opposite direction with a force that it was impossible to resist with the thread like line I was using. The shores of the island are lined with kelp here, and I fully expected to lose the fish, but I succeeded in turning it about 200ft. from the rocks, and then the fish began a series of circling, diving, hammering, rushing in and out, that I saw would in time wear me out. By the greatest effort I three times brought the fish to within 50ft. of the boat, when it would break away again, all the time towing the heavy boat around in a large circle. In this way three hours slipped away, and I noted what I consider to be the most remarkable feature of this fish: it continually gained strength and vigor.

At about 9:30, or about three hours from the time of the strike, the fish had towed us back to almost the identical spot where it was hooked, and after several desperate rushes, which almost resulted in its escape, it turned down the island and towed us five miles, stop ping only to rush in several times when I forced the fighting, and towing the boat stern first and against my boatman’s oars, which were held to stop it, and part of the distance against a heavy sea. The strength of this noble creature can be imagined when I say that two launches, which followed, were obliged to keep up half speed most of the time. Mr. Heverin being in the Catalina and Mr. C. L. Doran being in his launch, the Narod, with Mr. C. R. Scudder, of St. Louis, and Mr. Charles Orr, of London, who had come out from Avalon to see the finish.

The fish towed our boat directly home, or to Avalon Bay, and I am confident that it would have towed us five miles more, but I “forced the fighting,” and three times brought the fish to the gaff, and three times it broke away, and it was then, for the first, that I realized its ‘size and proportions. Again it was reeled in, its rich blue back and massive silver belly presenting a rich contrast, while numerous bright yellow fins flashed like gold. For a moment I held him and Gardner put the gaff into the silver mass. A wild plunge and the gaff went to pieces, and he was away, and we were in despair. Once more he was reeled in. and this time the big gaff caught hini and the magnificent creature came sliding into the boat a mass of silver sheen, a blaze of labradorite blue; while a cheer went up from the witnesses. The deed was done, yet I could not but regret taking so magnificent a creature, that had earned its liberty a thousand times in that hardly fought four hours.

The fish weighed 183lbs. an hour later, measured 6ft. 2in. in length, and was about 4ft. in girth around the deepest portion. I gave the fish to “Jim Gardner,” who is having it mounted, and will swing it on his fish stand, I presume, to commemorate the record catch, and I might add his own qualifications as a perfect boatman. To further illustrate the strength of a small tuna—one of 25lbs., when foul hooked, towed Mr. C. R. Scudder and Jim Gardner seven hours. The writer joined them, and was in the boat the last three hours, and when picked up we were seven miles from the island, in a heavy sea and the fish was as active as when it was hooked. It towed Mr. Scudder in all at least twenty miles, and my fairly-hooked 1831b. fish towed me, including the turns, at least ten miles.All tunas may not fight equally well. All fish differ. The long, slender tarpons are the “game fishes,” but I believe the “leaping tuna,” if taken on the tackle described, to be the great game fish of the world, and one which will afford unlimited sport to those lovers of rod and reel fishing who love big game at sea.

Charles Frederick Holder.

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Highlander Bible

How to Distinguish Fishes

 

Sept. 3, 1898. Forest and Stream Pg. 188-189

How to Distinguish Fishes.

BY FRED MATHER. The average angler knows by sight all the fish which he captures, but ask him to describe one and he is puzzled, and will get off on the color of the fish, which is [...] Read more →

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Click here to read The First Greek Book by John Williams White

The First Greek Book - 15.7MB

IN MEMORIAM

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Work in Progress…

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July, 16, l898 Forest and Stream Pg. 48

Tuna and Tarpon.

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Stoke Park – Granted by King Charles I

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Stoke Park Pavilions, UK, view from A405 Road. photo by Wikipedia user Cj1340

 

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Of the Room and Furniture

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Without any preliminary cleaning the bronze object to be treated is hung as cathode into the 2 per cent. caustic soda solution and a low amperage direct current is applied. The object is suspended with soft copper wires and is completely immersed into [...] Read more →

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July 2, 1898 Forest and Stream,

Fresh-Water Angling. No. IX.—The Two Crappies. BY FRED MATHER.

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To Choose Poultry.

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Sea and River Fishing

An angler with a costly pole Surmounted with a silver reel, Carven in quaint poetic scroll- Jointed and tipped with finest steel— With yellow flies, Whose scarlet eyes And jasper wings are fair to see, Hies to the stream Whose bubbles beam Down murmuring eddies wild and free. And casts the line with sportsman’s [...] Read more →

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BOOKS CONDEMNED TO BE BURNT.

By

JAMES ANSON FARRER,

LONDON

ELLIOT STOCK, 62, PATERNOSTER ROW

1892

———-

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From a Dictionary of the Thames from Oxford to the Nore. 1880 by Charles Dickens

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Cup of Tea? To be or not to be

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The Human Seasons

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It was a strange assignment. I picked up the telegram from desk and read it a third time.

NEW YORK, N.Y., MAY 9, 1949

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?

This video by AT Restoration is the best hands on video I have run across on the basics of classic upholstery. Watch a master at work. Simply amazing.

Tools:

Round needles: https://amzn.to/2S9IhrP Double pointed hand needle: https://amzn.to/3bDmWPp Hand tools: https://amzn.to/2Rytirc Staple gun (for beginner): https://amzn.to/2JZs3x1 Compressor [...] Read more →

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Furniture Polishing Cream.

Animal oil soap…………………….1 onuce Solution of potassium hydroxide…. .5 ounces Beeswax……………………………1 pound Oil of turpentine…………………..3 pints Water, enough to make……………..5 pints

Dissolve the soap in the lye with the aid of heat; add this solution all at once to the warm solution of the wax in the oil. Beat [...] Read more →

Banana Propagation

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Reprinted from the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA.org)

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Some Notes on American Ship Worms

July 9, 1898. Forest and Stream Pg. 25

Some Notes on American Ship-Worms.

[Read before the American Fishes Congress at Tampa.]

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Snipe shooting-Epistle on snipe shooting, from Ned Copper Cap, Esq., to George Trigger-George Trigger’s reply to Ned Copper Cap-Black partridge.

——

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The Stock Exchange Specialist

New York Stock Exchange Floor September 26,1963

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Jul. 30, 1898 Forest and Stream Pg. 87

Indian Mode of Hunting.

I.—Beaver.

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Bess of Hardwick: Four Times a Lady

Bess of Harwick

Four times the nuptial bed she warm’d, And every time so well perform’d, That when death spoil’d each husband’s billing, He left the widow every shilling. Fond was the dame, but not dejected; Five stately mansions she erected With more than royal pomp, to vary The prison of her captive When [...] Read more →

The Charge of the Light Brigade

Half a league, half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. “Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns!” he said. Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. Home Top of [...] Read more →

Mocking Bird Food

Mocking Bird Food.

Hemp seed……….2 pounds Rape seed………. .1 pound Crackers………….1 pound Rice…………….1/4 pound Corn meal………1/4 pound Lard oil…………1/4 pound

 

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Copper Kills Covid-19 and the Sun is Your Friend

The element copper effectively kills viruses and bacteria.

Therefore it would reason and I will assert and not only assert but lay claim to the patents for copper mesh stints to be inserted in the arteries of patients presenting with severe cases of Covid-19 with a slow release dosage of [...] Read more →

The Crime of the Congo by Arthur Conan Doyle

 

Man looks at severed hand and foot….for refusing to climb a tree to cut rubber for King Leopold

Click here to read The Crime of the Congo by Arthur Conan Doyle

Victim of King Leopold of Belgium

Click on the link below for faster download.

The [...] Read more →

The Racing Knockabout Gosling

The Racing Knockabout Gosling.

Gosling was the winning yacht of 1897 in one of the best racing classes now existing in this country, the Roston knockabout class. The origin of this class dates back about six years, when Carl, a small keel cutter, was built for C. H. [...] Read more →

A Summer Memory

 

Here, where these low lush meadows lie, We wandered in the summer weather, When earth and air and arching sky, Blazed grandly, goldenly together.

And oft, in that same summertime, We sought and roamed these self-same meadows, When evening brought the curfew chime, And peopled field and fold with shadows.

I mind me [...] Read more →

Watch Fraud on eBay

EBAY’S FRAUD PROBLEM IS GETTING WORSE

EBay has had a problem with fraudulent sellers since its inception back in 1995. Some aspects of the platform have improved with algorithms and automation, but others such as customer service and fraud have gotten worse. Small sellers have definitely been hurt by eBay’s [...] Read more →

Arsenic and Old Lace

What is follows is an historical article that appeared in The Hartford Courant in 1916 about the arsenic murders carried out by Mrs. Archer-Gilligan. This story is the basis for the 1944 Hollywood film “Arsenic and Old Lace” starring Cary Grant and Priscilla Lane and directed by Frank Capra. The [...] Read more →

Why Beauty Matters

Roger Scruton by Peter Helm

This is one of those videos that the so-called intellectual left would rather not be seen by the general public as it makes a laughing stock of the idiots running the artworld, a multi-billion dollar business.

https://archive.org/details/why-beauty-matters-roger-scruton

or Click here to watch

[...] Read more →

Slaughter in Bombay

From Allen’s Indian Mail, December 3rd, 1851

BOMBAY. MUSULMAN FANATICISM.

On the evening of November 15th, the little village of Mahim was the scene of a murder, perhaps the most determined which has ever stained the annals of Bombay. Three men were massacred in cold blood, in a house used [...] Read more →

Ought King Leopold to be Hanged?

King Leopold Butcher of the Congo

For the somewhat startling suggestion in the heading of this interview, the missionary interviewed is in no way responsible. The credit of it, or, if you like, the discredit, belongs entirely to the editor of the Review, who, without dogmatism, wishes to pose the question as [...] Read more →

Historic authenticity of the Spanish SAN FELIPE of 1690

San Felipe Model

Reprinted from FineModelShips.com with the kind permission of Dr. Michael Czytko

The SAN FELIPE is one of the most favoured ships among the ship model builders. The model is elegant, very beautifully designed, and makes a decorative piece of art to be displayed at home or in the [...] Read more →

The Character of a Happy Life

How happy is he born and taught. That serveth not another’s will; Whose armour is his honest thought, And simple truth his utmost skill

Whose passions not his masters are; Whose soul is still prepared for death, Untied unto the world by care Of public fame or private breath;

Who envies none that chance [...] Read more →

Zulu Yawl

Dec. 10, 1898 Forest and Stream Pg. 477-479

Zulu.

The little ship shown in the accompanying plans needs no description, as she speaks for herself, a handsome and shipshape craft that a man may own for years without any fear that she will go to pieces [...] Read more →

Here’s Many a Year to You

” Here’s many a year to you ! Sportsmen who’ve ridden life straight. Here’s all good cheer to you ! Luck to you early and late.

Here’s to the best of you ! You with the blood and the nerve. Here’s to the rest of you ! What of a weak moment’s swerve ? [...] Read more →

Harry Houdini Investigates the Spirit World

The magician delighted in exposing spiritualists as con men and frauds.

By EDMUND WILSON June 24, 1925

Houdini is a short strong stocky man with small feet and a very large head. Seen from the stage, his figure, with its short legs and its pugilist’s proportions, is less impressive than at close [...] Read more →

Cocktails and Canapés

From The How and When, An Authoritative reference reference guide to the origin, use and classification of the world’s choicest vintages and spirits by Hyman Gale and Gerald F. Marco. The Marco name is of a Chicago family that were involved in all aspects of the liquor business and ran Marco’s Bar [...] Read more →

Salmon Caviar

Salmon and Sturgeon Caviar – Photo by Thor

Salmon caviar was originated about 1910 by a fisherman in the Maritime Provinces of Siberia, and the preparation is a modification of the sturgeon caviar method (Cobb 1919). Salomon caviar has found a good market in the U.S.S.R. and other European countries where it [...] Read more →

Cocillana Syrup Compound

Guarea guidonia

Recipe

5 Per Cent Alcohol 8-24 Grain – Heroin Hydrochloride 120 Minims – Tincture Euphorbia Pilulifera 120 Minims – Syrup Wild Lettuce 40 Minims – Tincture Cocillana 24 Minims – Syrup Squill Compound 8 Gram – Ca(s)ecarin (P, D, & Co.) 8-100 Grain Menthol

Dose – One-half to one fluidrams (2 to [...] Read more →

Target Practice

Nov. 12, 1898 Forest and Stream Pg. 396

The Veterans to the Front.

Ironton. O., Oct. 28.—Editor Forest and Stream: I mail you a target made here today by Messrs. E. Lawton, G. Rogers and R. S. Dupuy. Mr. Dupuy is seventy-four years old, Mr. Lawton seventy-two. Mr. Rogers [...] Read more →

Cleaning Watch Chains

To Clean Watch Chains.

Gold or silver watch chains can be cleaned with a very excellent result, no matter whether they may be matt or polished, by laying them for a few seconds in pure aqua ammonia; they are then rinsed in alcohol, and finally. shaken in clean sawdust, free from sand. [...] Read more →

Why Beauty Matters – Sir Roger Scruton

Roger Scruton – Why Beauty Matters (2009) from Mirza Akdeniz on Vimeo.

Click here for another site on which to view this video.

Sadly, Sir Roger Scruton passed away a few days ago—January 12th, 2020. Heaven has gained a great philosopher.

Home Top of [...] Read more →

King William III on Horseback by Sir Godfrey Kneller

Reprint from The Royal Collection Trust website:

Kneller was born in Lubeck, studied with Rembrandt in Amsterdam and by 1676 was working in England as a fashionable portrait painter. He painted seven British monarchs (Charles II, James II, William III, Mary II, Anne, George I and George II), though his [...] Read more →

Travels by Narrowboat

Oh Glorious England, verdant fields and wandering canals…

In this wonderful series of videos, the CountryHouseGent takes the viewer along as he chugs up and down the many canals crisscrossing England in his classic Narrowboat. There is nothing like a free man charting his own destiny.

The Late Rev. H.M. Scarth

H. M. Scarth, Rector of Wrington

By the death of Mr. Scarth on the 5th of April, at Tangier, where he had gone for his health’s sake, the familiar form of an old and much valued Member of the Institute has passed away. Harry Mengden Scarth was bron at Staindrop in Durham, [...] Read more →

King Arthur Legends, Myths, and Maidens

King Arthur, Legends, Myths & Maidens is a massive book of Arthurian legends. This limited edition paperback was just released on Barnes and Noble at a price of $139.00. Although is may seem a bit on the high side, it may prove to be well worth its price as there are only [...] Read more →